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Agenda, decisions and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber - Civic Suite

Contact: Kevin Flaherty 0208 3149327 

Media

Items
No. Item

26.

Declaration of Interests pdf icon PDF 207 KB

Decision:

None.

Minutes:

No declarations were made.

27.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 26 KB

Decision:

Approved.

Minutes:

RESOLVED that the minutes of the two meetings held on July 24 2019 and

the meeting held on September 11 2019 be confirmed and signed as correct

records.

28.

Petitions pdf icon PDF 139 KB

Decision:

None.

Minutes:

No petitions were presented.

29.

Announcements or Communications pdf icon PDF 225 KB

Decision:

10 announcements were made.

Minutes:

1.Janet Senior

 

The first announcement reported the imminent retirement of Acting Chief

Executive, Janet Senior. Tributes for her more than thirty years of dedicated

service were paid by the Mayor, Deputy Mayor, Councillor Adefiranye and

Councillor Mallory. A presentation of flowers and a gift were made to her on behalf of the Labour Group.

 

Responding briefly, the Acting Chief Executive said it had been a pleasure to work for Lewisham and that she would miss the Council.

 

2.Defence Employer Recognition Scheme Gold Award

 

Councillor Bonavia reported on a Council success in gaining national recognition and he thanked the staff who had been involved.

 

3.Black History Month

 

The Mayor spoke promoting Black History Month which had been successfully launched the day before.

 

4. Age Against the Machine, Festival of Creative Ageing

 

The Deputy Mayor reported the final event was  to take place on the following Sunday at the Trinity Laban.

 

5. London Borough of Culture in 2021

 

Councillor Bourne encouraged all present to support the event and publicise the special bid website.

 

6. Chair of the Lewisham Disabled People’s Commission

 

Councillor Slater outlined the efforts being made to increase Accessibility.

 

7. Neighbourhood Community Infrastructure Levy

 

The Mayor announced bids could now be made for the funds that were available.

 

8. Mayor’s Business Awards

 

The Mayor encouraged members to promote the awards.

 

9. Mayor’s Award for Volunteering

 

The Mayor asked members to submit nominations from their wards.

 

10. Wellbeloved Butchers on Tanners Hill Deptford

 

The Council congratulated this business on its remarkable longevity and

association with Lewisham.

30.

Public questions pdf icon PDF 45 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

58 questions were heard at the meeting.

Minutes:

58 questions were received from members of the public which

were answered by the Cabinet Member indicated. Within the time available all

questioners were given the opportunity to raise supplementary questions.

 

A copy of the questions and answers was circulated separately and can be

viewed on the Council website with the meeting papers.

31.

Member questions pdf icon PDF 25 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

2 questions were heard at the meeting

Minutes:

2 questions were received from a Councillor which were answered by the

Cabinet Members indicated. A copy of the questions and answers was

circulated separately and can be viewed on the Council’s website with the

meeting papers.

32.

Statement of Accounts 2018-19 pdf icon PDF 218 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the adjustments to the financial statements in the Audit Findings Reports

be noted;

 

(2) the Action Plans set out in the reports be approved;

 

(3) the Letters of Representation on behalf of the Council be approved;

 

(4) the Annual Governance Statement (AGS) be approved; and

 

(5) the 2018/19 audited Statement of Accounts (including Main accounts,

Group accounts and Pension Fund accounts) be approved.

Minutes:

Councillor Amanda De Ryk moved that the recommendations be approved

and this was seconded by Councillor James Rathbone and it was then

unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the adjustments to the financial statements in the Audit Findings Reports

be noted;

 

(2) the Action Plans set out in the reports be approved;

 

(3) the Letters of Representation on behalf of the Council be approved;

 

(4) the Annual Governance Statement (AGS) be approved; and

 

(5) the 2018/19 audited Statement of Accounts (including Main accounts,

Group accounts and Pension Fund accounts) be approved.

33.

Friendship agreement Pokhara

Decision:

Item Withdrawn.

Minutes:

This item was withdrawn from the agenda.

34.

Action by Chair of Council pdf icon PDF 122 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the action taken by the Chair of Council be noted.

Minutes:

The Chair moved that the recommendation be approved and this was

seconded by the Vice Chair and it was then unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that the action taken by the Chair of Council be noted.

35.

Motion 1 Fairtrade Lewisham pdf icon PDF 129 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

This council notes that:

 

• 2019 marks 25 years since the FAIRTRADE Mark was launched in the UK.

 

• Since 1994, consumer demand for Fairtrade has grown thanks to the efforts

of grassroots campaigners, and pioneering Fair Trade businesses.

 

• There are now over 600 Fairtrade Communities in the UK and more than

2,000 globally.

 

• As a result of Fairtrade commitments from mainstream brands and retailers,

the UK Fairtrade market is now one of the biggest in the world.

 

• Global Fairtrade sales last year generated £142 million in Fairtrade

Premium. Farmers in 73 countries have invested this money in their

communities, increasing business productivity and contributing to the

achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

• Despite this positive news, exploitation remains rampant in global supply

chains. More than 40 million people are trapped in modern slavery, including

forced labour, and 152 million young people in child labour. Hundreds of

millions more are earning less than a living income or wage.

 

This council believes that:

 

• Fairtrade and the wider Fair Trade movement has a significant contribution

to make towards ending exploitation in global supply chains and achieving the

SDGs.

 

• The recently agreed International Fair Trade Charter should be welcomed,

with its vision of transforming trade to work for people and planet.

 

• The Fairtrade principles of paying a ‘premium’ that is wholly managed by

farmers and workers themselves, and of minimum prices to protect producers

from market volatility, are crucial to systemic change.

 

• Public bodies, including local authorities, should support ethical procurement

policies, using their purchasing power to support Fairtrade and ensure their

supply chains, at home and abroad, are free of exploitation, including modern

slavery.

 

• Companies operating through global supply chains should go further and

take steps to require the payment of living wages and achievement of living

incomes for all.

 

This council resolves to:

 

• Renew its commitment to achieving ‘Fairtrade Community’ status.

 

• Actively promote Ethical Trade locally, through support for local groups, in

the media including social media, and events, including during Fairtrade

Fortnight.

 

• Support local Fairtrade Schools and Universities, and actively promote

Fairtrade teaching materials in local schools and educational institutions.

 

• Celebrate and incentivise businesses championing Fairtrade products in the

local community.

 

• To ask the Mayor and Cabinet to review its procurement policy, including its

catering offer, to ensure that ethically procured produce is chosen wherever

possible, and that Ethical Trade considerations are included as a preference

in any contracts going out to tender.

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor James Walsh and seconded

by Councillor Joan Millbank. The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

This council notes that:

 

• 2019 marks 25 years since the FAIRTRADE Mark was launched in the UK.

 

• Since 1994, consumer demand for Fairtrade has grown thanks to the efforts

of grassroots campaigners, and pioneering Fair Trade businesses.

 

• There are now over 600 Fairtrade Communities in the UK and more than

2,000 globally.

 

• As a result of Fairtrade commitments from mainstream brands and retailers,

the UK Fairtrade market is now one of the biggest in the world.

 

• Global Fairtrade sales last year generated £142 million in Fairtrade

Premium. Farmers in 73 countries have invested this money in their

communities, increasing business productivity and contributing to the

achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

• Despite this positive news, exploitation remains rampant in global supply

chains. More than 40 million people are trapped in modern slavery, including

forced labour, and 152 million young people in child labour. Hundreds of

millions more are earning less than a living income or wage.

 

This council believes that:

 

• Fairtrade and the wider Fair Trade movement has a significant contribution

to make towards ending exploitation in global supply chains and achieving the

SDGs.

 

• The recently agreed International Fair Trade Charter should be welcomed,

with its vision of transforming trade to work for people and planet.

 

• The Fairtrade principles of paying a ‘premium’ that is wholly managed by

farmers and workers themselves, and of minimum prices to protect producers

from market volatility, are crucial to systemic change.

 

• Public bodies, including local authorities, should support ethical procurement

policies, using their purchasing power to support Fairtrade and ensure their

supply chains, at home and abroad, are free of exploitation, including modern

slavery.

 

• Companies operating through global supply chains should go further and

take steps to require the payment of living wages and achievement of living

incomes for all.

 

This council resolves to:

 

• Renew its commitment to achieving ‘Fairtrade Community’ status.

 

• Actively promote Ethical Trade locally, through support for local groups, in

the media including social media, and events, including during Fairtrade

Fortnight.

 

• Support local Fairtrade Schools and Universities, and actively promote

Fairtrade teaching materials in local schools and educational institutions.

 

• Celebrate and incentivise businesses championing Fairtrade products in the

local community.

 

• To ask the Mayor and Cabinet to review its procurement policy, including its

catering offer, to ensure that ethically procured produce is chosen wherever

possible, and that Ethical Trade considerations are included as a preference

in any contracts going out to tender.

36.

Motion 2: A fully funded, proper pay-rise for Local Government workers pdf icon PDF 130 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

This council notes

 

-           Government has endured central government funding cuts of nearly

50% since 2010.

 

-           Between 2010 and 2020, councils will have lost 60p out of every £1

they have received from central government.

 

-           The 2019 LGA survey of council finances found that 1 in 3 councils fear

they will run out of funding to provide even their statutory, legal duties by

2022/23. This number rises to almost two thirds of councils by 2024/2025 or

later.

 

-           The LGA estimates councils will face a funding gap of £8 billion by

2025.

 

-           Faced with these cuts from central government, the local government

workforce has endured years of pay restraint with the majority of pay points

losing 22 per cent of their value since 2009/10.

 

-           At the same time as seeing their pay go down in real terms, workers

experience ever increasing workloads and persistent job insecurity. Across

the UK, an estimated 876,000 jobs have been lost in local government since

June 2010 – a reduction of 30 per cent. Local government has arguably been

hit by more severe job losses than any other part of the public sector.

 

-           There has been a disproportionate impact on women, with women

making up more than three quarters of the local government workforce.

 

This council believes

 

-           Our workers are public service super heroes.  They keep our

communities clean, look after those in need and keep our towns and cities

running.

 

-           Without the professionalism and dedication of our staff, the council

services our residents rely on would not be deliverable.

 

-           Government funding has been cut to the extent that a proper pay rise

could result in a reduction in local government services.

 

-           The government needs to take responsibility and fully fund increases in

pay; it should not put the burden on local authorities whose funding been cut

to the bone.

 

This council resolves to

 

-           Support the pay claim submitted by Unite, GMB and UNISON to the

Government, on behalf of council and school workers for a £10 per hour

minimum wage and a 10 per cent uplift across all other pay points in 2020/21.

 

-           Call on the Local Government Association to make urgent

representations to central government to fund the NJC pay claim

 

-           Write to the Chancellor and Secretary of State to call for a pay increase

for local government workers to be funded with new money from central

government.

 

-           Meet with local NJC union representatives to convey support for the

pay claim.

 

-           Encourage all local government workers to join a union

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Bill Brown and seconded

by Councillor Silvana Kelleher. Following a contribution from Councillor Paul

Bell, the motion was then put to the vote and declared to be unanimously

carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

This council notes

 

-           Government has endured central government funding cuts of nearly

50% since 2010.

 

-           Between 2010 and 2020, councils will have lost 60p out of every £1

they have received from central government.

 

-           The 2019 LGA survey of council finances found that 1 in 3 councils fear

they will run out of funding to provide even their statutory, legal duties by

2022/23. This number rises to almost two thirds of councils by 2024/2025 or

later.

 

-           The LGA estimates councils will face a funding gap of £8 billion by

2025.

 

-           Faced with these cuts from central government, the local government

workforce has endured years of pay restraint with the majority of pay points

losing 22 per cent of their value since 2009/10.

 

-           At the same time as seeing their pay go down in real terms, workers

experience ever increasing workloads and persistent job insecurity. Across

the UK, an estimated 876,000 jobs have been lost in local government since

June 2010 – a reduction of 30 per cent. Local government has arguably been

hit by more severe job losses than any other part of the public sector.

 

-           There has been a disproportionate impact on women, with women

making up more than three quarters of the local government workforce.

 

This council believes

 

-           Our workers are public service super heroes.  They keep our

communities clean, look after those in need and keep our towns and cities

running.

 

-           Without the professionalism and dedication of our staff, the council

services our residents rely on would not be deliverable.

 

-           Government funding has been cut to the extent that a proper pay rise

could result in a reduction in local government services.

 

-           The government needs to take responsibility and fully fund increases in

pay; it should not put the burden on local authorities whose funding been cut

to the bone.

 

This council resolves to

 

-           Support the pay claim submitted by Unite, GMB and UNISON to the

Government, on behalf of council and school workers for a £10 per hour

minimum wage and a 10 per cent uplift across all other pay points in 2020/21.

 

-           Call on the Local Government Association to make urgent

representations to central government to fund the NJC pay claim

 

-           Write to the Chancellor and Secretary of State to call for a pay increase

for local government workers to be funded with new money from central

government.

 

-           Meet with local NJC union representatives to convey support for the

pay claim.

 

-           Encourage all local government workers to join a union

37.

Motion 3 Free School Meals for NRPF children pdf icon PDF 125 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Council notes:

 

1.         Children in years 3 and above cannot receive free school meals

(FSMs) if their parents are migrants with leave to remain subject to a “no

recourse to public fund” (NRPF) condition, or are undocumented.

 

2.         These are often some of the poorest and most vulnerable children in

schools. Across the country, many report going hungry; where meals are

provided, parents could receive bills they cannot afford to pay.

 

3.         Lewisham schools and many other schools across the country use

their discretion to ensure that children do not go hungry, but without any extra

funds to meet the costs.

 

4.         North East London Migrant Action (NELMA), with the support in the

labour and trade union movements of Labour Campaign for Free Movement

(LCFM), are campaigning for all children who need them to receive FSMs and

to end NRPF policies.

 

Council believes:

 

1.         No child should go hungry in school because of their parents’

immigration status.

 

2.         We oppose the inhumanity and racism of such “hostile environment”

policies.

 

3.         Free school meals should be a basic right for ALL children who need

them

 

4.         NRPF policies undermine all workers: when migrant workers are afraid

that losing their job means their children will go hungry or they will have no

social security to fall back on, they are more vulnerable to mistreatment by

exploitative employers, undermining pay and conditions for all of us.

 

Council resolves to:

 

1.         Send our support to NELMA and LCFM for the campaign to repeal this

and all the discriminatory NRPF-related policies, and for local authorities to

meet the need for FSMs in the interim.

 

2.         Lobby government  to this end to provide the funding for children on

FSM.

 

3.         Continue to work with Lewisham Schools to ensure that NRPF children

that would otherwise be entitled to FSM are provided with them and to

consider issuing guidance to schools, if necessary, until the Government fund

local authorities to provide such meals.

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Chris Barnham and seconded

by Councillor Sakina Sheikh. Following a contribution from Councillor Stephen

Penfold, the motion was then put to the vote and declared to be unanimously

carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Council notes:

 

1. Children in years 3 and above cannot receive free school meals

(FSMs) if their parents are migrants with leave to remain subject to a “no

recourse to public fund” (NRPF) condition, or are undocumented.

 

2. These are often some of the poorest and most vulnerable children in

schools. Across the country, many report going hungry; where meals are

provided, parents could receive bills they cannot afford to pay.

 

3. Lewisham schools and many other schools across the country use

their discretion to ensure that children do not go hungry, but without any extra

funds to meet the costs.

 

4. North East London Migrant Action (NELMA), with the support in the

labour and trade union movements of Labour Campaign for Free Movement

(LCFM), are campaigning for all children who need them to receive FSMs and

to end NRPF policies.

 

Council believes:

 

1. No child should go hungry in school because of their parents’

immigration status.

 

2. We oppose the inhumanity and racism of such “hostile environment”

policies.

 

3. Free school meals should be a basic right for ALL children who need

them

 

4. NRPF policies undermine all workers: when migrant workers are afraid

that losing their job means their children will go hungry or they will have no

social security to fall back on, they are more vulnerable to mistreatment by

exploitative employers, undermining pay and conditions for all of us.

 

Council resolves to:

 

1. Send our support to NELMA and LCFM for the campaign to repeal this

and all the discriminatory NRPF-related policies, and for local authorities to

meet the need for FSMs in the interim.

 

2. Lobby government  to this end to provide the funding for children on

FSM.

 

3. Continue to work with Lewisham Schools to ensure that NRPF children

that would otherwise be entitled to FSM are provided with them and to

consider issuing guidance to schools, if necessary, until the Government fund

local authorities to provide such meals.

 

The meeting closed at 9.05pm