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Agenda, decisions and draft minutes

Venue: Council Chamber - Civic Suite

Contact: Kevin Flaherty 0208 3149327 

Items
No. Item

1.

Declaration of Interests pdf icon PDF 206 KB

Decision:

Declarations were made by Councillor John Paschoud, Councillor Jacq Paschoud, Councillor Barnham, Councillor Walsh and Councillor Copley.

Minutes:

Councillor John Paschoud declared a personal interest in Item 6 as a Local

Authority Governor at Perrymount Primary Schools and as the husband of a

Governor at two SEN schools.

 

Councillor Jacq Paschoud declared a personal interest in Item 6 as a Local

Authority Governor attwo SEN schools  and as the wife of a School Governor.

 

Councillor Barnham declared a personal interest in Item 6 as the Chair of

Governors of two schools listed in a question.

 

Councillors Walsh and Copley declared a personal interest in Item 16 as

members of the LGBT+ Labour campaign.

2.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 26 KB

Decision:

Agreed

Minutes:

RESOLVED that the minutes of the meetings held on April 3 2019 be

confirmed and signed as a correct record.

3.

Petitions pdf icon PDF 127 KB

Decision:

Petition notified by Mr R Woolford not received.

 

Councillor Millbank notified Council of an electronic petition she had received

from Mr Matthew Clark.

Minutes:

Notice of a petition was given by Mr Ray Woolford who was not present to

lodge his petition.

 

Councillor Millbank notified Council of an electronic petition she had received

from Mr Matthew Clark asking for Electricity Charging Points in her ward.

4.

Announcements or Communications pdf icon PDF 209 KB

Decision:

There were six announcements and one formal item in respect of the

following:

 

Councillor Alan Hall

 

RESOLVED that the reason for the non-attendance of Councillor Alan Hall at

Council meetings be approved.

Minutes:

There were seven announcements and one formal item in respect of the

following:

 

Report of the Returning Officer

 

The Chair welcomed Councillors Powell and Openshaw to their first meeting of the Council.

 

Obituaries- former Councillor Terry Scott, Dennis Hunter, Simon Garcha

 

The Chair welcomed former Councillor Sylvia Scott to the meeting. Councillor

Jim Mallory paid tribute to former Councillor Terry Scott remembering him as

a force to be reckoned with over his 28 years service with the Council. He

recalled him as a blunt and outspoken figure who could be flexible, loyal,

pragmatic and principled. He relayed the appreciation of Councillor Adefiranye

who could not be present at the meeting. Councillor Adefiranye had been a

ward colleague in Brockley and remembered him as a team player who had

once stood aside to allow a BAME candidate to assume a position.

 

Councillor Susan Wise paid tribute to Dennis Hunter a former youth services

officer who had been an initial member of the Young Mayor’s team and who

had continued to work closely with the Council after his retirement serving

with the Lavender Trust in raising funds for charity.

 

The Chair welcomed Ruth Garcha to the meeting. Councillor Chris Best

Remembered Simon Garcha as a devoted father and great supporter of the

local community in Forest Hill. Had he not gone to Australia for some years,

she thought he would have made a great Councillor given his fantastic

communication skills and record as a fundraiser for charity.

 

Queen’s Birthday Honours List

 

The Council congratulated those persons with a Lewisham link who had been

honoured in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

 

Top Women Cyclists

 

The Council congratulated Jane Davis of Lewisham Cyclists on her national

recognition.

 

Britain’s Best Walking Neighbourhood

 

The Council congratulated Jack Cornish and those involved in ensuring

Brockley’s success.

 

Launch of Beckenham Place Park

 

The Council noted the successful initial re-launch of the park on July 20.

 

 

 

Councillor Alan Hall

 

Councillor Moore moved and Councillor Millbank seconded a unanimous

motion that Councillor Alan Hall be granted a leave of absence for the reason

stated.

 

RESOLVED that the reason for the non-attendance of Councillor Alan Hall at

Council meetings be approved.

 

Gavel

 

Prior to the end of the meeting the Chair reported a replacement gavel made

from wood obtained in Beckenham Place Park had been donated by Perry

Vale Councillor John Paschoud.

5.

Public questions pdf icon PDF 51 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

45 of the 77 questions were able to pose supplementary questions.

Minutes:

77 questions were received from members of the public which

were answered by the Cabinet Member indicated. In the time available 45

questioners were given the opportunity to raise supplementary questions.

 

A copy of the questions and answers was circulated separately and can be

viewed on the Council website with the meeting papers.

6.

Member questions pdf icon PDF 25 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

All 22 questions were consider in the time aqllocated.

Minutes:

22 questions were received from Councillors which were answered by the

Cabinet Members indicated. A copy of the questions and answers was

circulated separately and can be viewed on the Council’s website with the

meeting papers.

7.

Appointment of Chief Executive pdf icon PDF 233 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the rigorous selection process completed by the Appointments

Panel to recruit a new Chief Executive be noted;

 

(2) the unanimous recommendation of the Appointments Panel, that Kim

Wright bes appointed as Lewisham Council’s new Chief Executive be

approved;

 

(3) the Director of Organisational Development and Human Resources be

authorised to agree a start date with the new Chief Executive (likely to be

towards the end of October 2019);

 

(4) the salary agreed bes within the range approved by Council;

 

(5) the Interim Chief Executive arrangements, agreed by Council on 28

November 2018 cease on the date the new permanent Chief Executive

commences.

Minutes:

The recommendations were proposed by the Mayor and seconded by

Councillor Bill Brown.

 

In proposing the recommendations, the Mayor thanked Janet Senior for the

service given in her second stint as Acting Chief Executive. He confirmed that

the proposed appointment of Kim Wright was the unanimous decision of the

special Appointments Panel.

 

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the rigorous selection process completed by the Appointments Panel to

recruit a new Chief Executive be noted;

 

(2) the unanimous recommendation of the Appointments Panel, that Kim

Wright bes appointed as Lewisham Council’s new Chief Executive be

approved;

 

(3) the Director of Organisational Development and Human Resources be

authorised to agree a start date with the new Chief Executive (likely to be

towards the end of October 2019);

 

(4) the salary agreed bes within the range approved by Council;

 

(5) the Interim Chief Executive arrangements, agreed by Council on 28

November 2018 cease on the date the new permanent Chief Executive

commences.

8.

Children and Young People Plan pdf icon PDF 479 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the Children and Young People’s Plan 2019-22 be adopted.

Minutes:

Councillor Chris Barnham moved that the recommendations be approved

and this was seconded by Councillor Luke Sorba and it was then

unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that the Children and Young People’s Plan 2019-22 be adopted.

9.

CRPL Business Plan pdf icon PDF 143 KB

Additional documents:

Decision:

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) the 2019/20 Business Plan for the Catford Regeneration Partnership

Limited (CRPL) be endorsed; and

 

(2) the associated budget be endorsed.

Minutes:

The Mayor moved that the recommendations be approved and this was

seconded by Councillor John Paschoud and it was then unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) the 2019/20 Business Plan for the Catford Regeneration Partnership

Limited (CRPL) be endorsed; and

 

(2) the associated budget be endorsed.

10.

NCIL pdf icon PDF 445 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) to the extent that it is a non-executive function the proposed NCIL Strategy

be approved; and

 

(2) to the extent that it is a non-executive function the allocation of 25% of CIL

to the NCIL process be approved.

Minutes:

The Mayor moved that the recommendations be approved and this was

seconded by Councillor Liam Curran and it was then unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) to the extent that it is a non-executive function the proposed NCIL Strategy

be approved; and

 

(2) to the extent that it is a non-executive function the allocation of 25% of CIL

to the NCIL process be approved.

11.

Parental Leave pdf icon PDF 266 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that

 

(1) having considered the recommendations of the London Councils

Independent Remuneration Panel, the incorporation of paid parental leave in

its Scheme of Allowances be approved and ithe features of that scheme be

determined;

 

(2) subject to agreement to the terms of a members parental leave

Scheme, officers be asked to publish notice of change to the Members

Scheme of Allowances in a local newspaper and ensure that copies are

available for inspection at all reasonable hours; and

 

(3) subject to agreement of a members’ parental leave scheme, the Council’s

Constitution be amended to incorporate the amended Scheme of Members

Allowances.

Minutes:

Councillor Sophie Davis moved that the recommendations be approved and

this was seconded by Councillor Chris Best and it was then unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that

 

(1) having considered the recommendations of the London Councils

Independent Remuneration Panel, the incorporation of paid parental leave in

its Scheme of Allowances be approved and ithe features of that scheme be

determined;

 

(2) subject to agreement to the terms of a members parental leave

Scheme, officers be asked to publish notice of change to the Members

Scheme of Allowances in a local newspaper and ensure that copies are

available for inspection at all reasonable hours; and

 

(3) subject to agreement of a members’ parental leave scheme, the Council’s

Constitution be amended to incorporate the amended Scheme of Members

Allowances.

12.

Appointments pdf icon PDF 124 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the 3 year term previously given to Councillor Johnston-Franklin on the

Youth First Board be extended to March 31 2020;

 

(2) Councillor Lionel Openshaw be appointed to Planning Committee C and

the Audit Panel;

 

(3) Councillor Kim Powell be appointed to the Licensing Committee and the

Standards Committee; and

 

(4) the following appointments made by the Overview & Scrutiny Committee

be noted:

 

(a) Councillor Lionel Openshaw to the Safer Stronger Communities Select

Committee

 

(b) Councillor Kim Powell be appointed to the Healthier Communities Select

Committee

Minutes:

The Council stood adjoumed from 9.06pm to 9.07pm while the Overview and

Scrutiny Committee agreed the fourth recommendation shown below.

 

Councillor Moore moved that the appointment recommendations 1 to 3 be

approved and this was seconded by Councillor Joan Millbank and it was then

unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that

 

(1) the 3 year term previously given to Councillor Johnston-Franklin on the

Youth First Board be extended to March 31 2020;

 

(2) Councillor Lionel Openshaw be appointed to Planning Committee C and

the Audit Panel;

 

(3) Councillor Kim Powell be appointed to the Licensing Committee and the

Standards Committee; and

 

(4) the following appointments made by the Overview & Scrutiny Committee

be noted:

 

(a) Councillor Lionel Openshaw to the Safer Stronger Communities Select

Committee

 

(b) Councillor Kim Powell be appointed to the Healthier Communities Select

Committee

13.

Ward Boundary Review pdf icon PDF 223 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) appoints Councillors Alan Smith, Chris Best, James Rathbone, James-J

Walsh, Jimi Adefiranye, Brenda Dacres, John Paschoud and Susan Wise to a

working group to oversee the development of a further Council submission to

the LGBC; and

 

(2) Council Urgency Committee be convened in August to agree a final

submission on behalf of Council to be submitted to the LGBC by 2 September

2019.

Minutes:

Councillor Chris Best moved that the recommendations be approved and

this was seconded by Councillor Kevin Bonavia and it was then unanimously:

 

RESOLVED that:

 

(1) appoints Councillors Alan Smith, Chris Best, James Rathbone, James-J

Walsh, Jimi Adefiranye, Brenda Dacres, John Paschoud and Susan Wise to a

working group to oversee the development of a further Council submission to

the LGBC; and

 

(2) Council Urgency Committee be convened in August to agree a final

submission on behalf of Council to be submitted to the LGBC by 2 September

2019.

14.

Motion 1 Councillor Holland Councillor Bernards pdf icon PDF 240 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Improving mental health support for BAME children and young people


Lewisham Council notes:

 

  • Nationally, demand for mental health support is up but services are  

diminishing, and Lewisham is no exception to this trend. In June last

year the NHS England boss, Simon Stevens, said a major expansion of

services is needed to deal with growing demand.

 

  • The SLAM ‘Meeting the public sector equality duty’ 2017 report shows

that BAME young people in Lewisham gain less access to CAMHS

services than their peers: approximately 58% of the young population

were BAME according to the last census in 2011, but only

approximately 46% of our CAMHS services were supporting BAME

young people.

 

  • The Up My Street report by the Centre for Mental Health[1] sets out how

young African/ Caribbean young men are less likely to access

conventional statutory therapy because current service offers are rarely

culturally sensitive and can reinforce stereotypes. Similarly, Charlie

Taylor’s review for the Ministry of Justice[2] (paragraph 26) found that

that a clinic-based approach rarely works for excluded young people.

 

  • An approach based on co-production which empowers young people

and meets them ‘where they are at’, has been demonstrated to be the

most effective means of supporting excluded young people or those at

risk of exclusion. This community psychology approach has been

delivered in other parts of London and often starts out in a park or

within an estate and doesn’t rely on young people who may have a

chaotic home life and a distrust of ‘authorities’ turning up to

appointments.

 

  • Young people affected by serious youth violence in their communities

are much more likely to become psychologically distressed. Supporting

these young people should emphasise relationships and engagement

through co-production and holistic support in their communities.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

1)    Call on the government to reverse its aggressive cuts programme

which has led to a crisis in mental health support for children and

young people and increase funding.

 

2)    Ensure that the development of the borough’s children and young

people’s mental health provision adequately and effectively supports

BAME young people and those at risk of exclusion.

 

3)    Puts effective mental heath support for BAME and excluded young

people at the heart of our public health approach to serious youth

violence and ensures that young people with lived experience of

serious youth violence are central to the development of this provision.

 

4)    Invite VCS organisations/ LAs with a track record of delivering mental

health support to BAME (and excluded) young people to share practice

in an all member session, involving young people with lived

experience.

 

 



[1] www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/against-the-odds

[2] www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-youth-justice-system

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Octavia Holland and formally seconded

by Councillor Peter Bernards.The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Improving mental health support for BAME children and young people

 

Lewisham Council notes:

 

  • Nationally, demand for mental health support is up but services are 

diminishing, and Lewisham is no exception to this trend. In June last

year the NHS England boss, Simon Stevens, said a major expansion of

services is needed to deal with growing demand.

 

  • The SLAM ‘Meeting the public sector equality duty’ 2017 report shows

that BAME young people in Lewisham gain less access to CAMHS

services than their peers: approximately 58% of the young population

were BAME according to the last census in 2011, but only

approximately 46% of our CAMHS services were supporting BAME

young people.

 

  • The Up My Street report by the Centre for Mental Health[1] sets out how

young African/ Caribbean young men are less likely to access

conventional statutory therapy because current service offers are rarely

culturally sensitive and can reinforce stereotypes. Similarly, Charlie

Taylor’s review for the Ministry of Justice[2] (paragraph 26) found that

that a clinic-based approach rarely works for excluded young people.

 

  • An approach based on co-production which empowers young people

and meets them ‘where they are at’, has been demonstrated to be the

most effective means of supporting excluded young people or those at

risk of exclusion. This community psychology approach has been

delivered in other parts of London and often starts out in a park or

within an estate and doesn’t rely on young people who may have a

chaotic home life and a distrust of ‘authorities’ turning up to

appointments.

 

  • Young people affected by serious youth violence in their communities

are much more likely to become psychologically distressed. Supporting

these young people should emphasise relationships and engagement

through co-production and holistic support in their communities.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

1)    Call on the government to reverse its aggressive cuts programme

which has led to a crisis in mental health support for children and

young people and increase funding.

 

2)    Ensure that the development of the borough’s children and young

people’s mental health provision adequately and effectively supports

BAME young people and those at risk of exclusion.

 

3)    Puts effective mental heath support for BAME and excluded young

people at the heart of our public health approach to serious youth

violence and ensures that young people with lived experience of

serious youth violence are central to the development of this provision.

 

4)    Invite VCS organisations/ LAs with a track record of delivering mental

health support to BAME (and excluded) young people to share practice

in an all member session, involving young people with lived

experience.

 

 



[1] www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/against-the-odds

[2] www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-youth-justice-system

15.

Motion 2 Councillor Muldoon Councillor Best pdf icon PDF 122 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

NHS Long Term Plan

 

Lewisham Council notes the intentions to reform local commissioning of NHS

services within the NHS Long Term Plan.

 

Lewisham Council notes that in 2012 NHS England stated there would be no

more reorganisation. The NHS Long Term Plan was published in January

2019.  One of many suggested changes was that each STP should become

an Integrated Care System.  To help achieve this, NHS England proposes

that there be one CCG for each STP area.  The reason is to give the STP/ICS

legal footing.  The CCGs are set up in law by the Health and Social Care Act

2012.  The STP/ICS are a later introduction, and currently only have

legitimacy insofar as it is shared by their constituent CCGs and local NHS

Providers.  

 

Lewisham Council notes that the changes would mean moving from the

current 191 CCGs to just 44, one per STP "footprint".  NHS England has

separate powers which allow it to vary a CCG’s area or membership without

an application from the CCG. The Plan suggests that this should be achieved

by April 2021, but in SE London  the intention is to achieve it by April 2020. 

 

Lewisham Council notes that the introduction of CCGs introduced more

clinical involvement in commissioning, and significantly more GP involvement,

and retained good local input and accountability. 

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern the proposal to merge the current six

South East London CCGs into a single body, who along with local NHS and Local Authority partners will be known as an Integrated Care System.

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern that by merging NHS commissioning to

South East London level there is a risk of losing clinical input and local

involvement resulting in democratic deficit.

 

Lewisham Council notes that currently there are statutory duties on CCGs and

some of their committees to meet in public, and trusts these will be retained

under any reforms 

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern that there is a lack of clarity as to where

power and decision making would lie.

 

Lewisham Council calls upon the Mayor to provide the Council’s formal

response to the consultation, highlighting the foregoing points of concern.

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor John Muldoon and formally seconded

by Councillor Chris Best. The motion was then put to the vote and declared to

be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

NHS Long Term Plan

 

Lewisham Council notes the intentions to reform local commissioning of NHS

services within the NHS Long Term Plan.

 

Lewisham Council notes that in 2012 NHS England stated there would be no

more reorganisation. The NHS Long Term Plan was published in January

2019.  One of many suggested changes was that each STP should become

an Integrated Care System.  To help achieve this, NHS England proposes

that there be one CCG for each STP area.  The reason is to give the STP/ICS

legal footing.  The CCGs are set up in law by the Health and Social Care Act

2012.  The STP/ICS are a later introduction, and currently only have

legitimacy insofar as it is shared by their constituent CCGs and local NHS

Providers.  

 

Lewisham Council notes that the changes would mean moving from the

current 191 CCGs to just 44, one per STP "footprint".  NHS England has

separate powers which allow it to vary a CCG’s area or membership without

an application from the CCG. The Plan suggests that this should be achieved

by April 2021, but in SE London  the intention is to achieve it by April 2020. 

 

Lewisham Council notes that the introduction of CCGs introduced more

clinical involvement in commissioning, and significantly more GP involvement,

and retained good local input and accountability. 

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern the proposal to merge the current six

South East London CCGs into a single body, who along with local NHS and Local Authority partners will be known as an Integrated Care System.

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern that by merging NHS commissioning to

South East London level there is a risk of losing clinical input and local

involvement resulting in democratic deficit.

 

Lewisham Council notes that currently there are statutory duties on CCGs and

some of their committees to meet in public, and trusts these will be retained

under any reforms 

 

Lewisham Council notes with concern that there is a lack of clarity as to where

power and decision making would lie.

 

Lewisham Council calls upon the Mayor to provide the Council’s formal

response to the consultation, highlighting the foregoing points of concern.

16.

Motion 3 Councillor Walsh Councillor Moore pdf icon PDF 141 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

LGBT+ inclusive Relationship & Sex Education


This Council welcomes the introduction of statutory Relationships Education

and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE), which all primary and secondary

schools in England respectively will be required to teach from September

2020.

 

Recently we have seen a small but growing minority of vocal individuals who

have begun lobbying primary schools, spreading misinformation and in some

cases leading protests outside schools, trying to stop LGBT+ inclusive RSE.

 

People of all faiths and none, are LGBT and it is vital that all children receive

comprehensive and inclusive ‘relationships and sex’ education, regardless of

their parents’ beliefs. The last guidance on relationships and sex education

was written over 20 years ago, and we need to ensure that we bring this

guidance up to date and that all children are receiving the education they

need to understand their identity, navigate the world, and form healthy and

respectful relationships.

 

The 2017 Labour Manifesto confirmed the party’s commitment to “age-

appropriate inclusive RSE”. The term ‘age appropriate’ should be taken to

mean the age at which children and young people are introduced to different

aspects of relationships, including sex (but not exclusively), and should not

indicate that same sex relationships should be taught at a different age to

heterosexual relationships.

 

This Council notes that ridding this country of the scourge of Section 28

(which gagged Schools and Local Authorities from acknowledging the LGBT+

community and their needs in compulsory education) was a significant win for

LGBT Equality, and we must play no part in rowing back the tides of progress

that have been made since then.

 

This Council also believes that parents’ rights and religious freedoms should

be respected but balanced against children’s independent, legally protected

rights and the need to eliminate discrimination. We believe schools should be

supported to proactively communicate with parents and carers about the

nature and importance of RSE and the detrimental effects that withdrawal

might have on their children.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

  • Confirm its support for compulsory relationship education for all

schools (including primary schools) which is LGBT+ inclusive and

promotes respect, acceptance and diversity.

 

  • Write to the Secretary for Education asking them to ensure they don’t

just pass policy, but make the Government’s inclusive Relationship &

Sex Education a reality, through providing resource to ensure the

necessary training, resources, guidance and support for schools and

teachers in introducing and maintaining inclusive RSE.

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor James Walsh and formally seconded

by Councillor Hilary Moore.The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be overwhelmingly carried with one abstention.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

LGBT+ inclusive Relationship & Sex Education


This Council welcomes the introduction of statutory Relationships Education

and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE), which all primary and secondary

schools in England respectively will be required to teach from September

2020.

 

Recently we have seen a small but growing minority of vocal individuals who

have begun lobbying primary schools, spreading misinformation and in some

cases leading protests outside schools, trying to stop LGBT+ inclusive RSE.

 

People of all faiths and none, are LGBT and it is vital that all children receive

comprehensive and inclusive ‘relationships and sex’ education, regardless of

their parents’ beliefs. The last guidance on relationships and sex education

was written over 20 years ago, and we need to ensure that we bring this

guidance up to date and that all children are receiving the education they

need to understand their identity, navigate the world, and form healthy and

respectful relationships.

 

The 2017 Labour Manifesto confirmed the party’s commitment to “age-

appropriate inclusive RSE”. The term ‘age appropriate’ should be taken to

mean the age at which children and young people are introduced to different

aspects of relationships, including sex (but not exclusively), and should not

indicate that same sex relationships should be taught at a different age to

heterosexual relationships.

 

This Council notes that ridding this country of the scourge of Section 28

(which gagged Schools and Local Authorities from acknowledging the LGBT+

community and their needs in compulsory education) was a significant win for

LGBT Equality, and we must play no part in rowing back the tides of progress

that have been made since then.

 

This Council also believes that parents’ rights and religious freedoms should

be respected but balanced against children’s independent, legally protected

rights and the need to eliminate discrimination. We believe schools should be

supported to proactively communicate with parents and carers about the

nature and importance of RSE and the detrimental effects that withdrawal

might have on their children.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

  • Confirm its support for compulsory relationship education for all

schools (including primary schools) which is LGBT+ inclusive and

promotes respect, acceptance and diversity.

 

  • Write to the Secretary for Education asking them to ensure they don’t

just pass policy, but make the Government’s inclusive Relationship &

Sex Education a reality, through providing resource to ensure the

necessary training, resources, guidance and support for schools and

teachers in introducing and maintaining inclusive RSE.

17.

Motion 4 Councillor Sorba Councillor Howard pdf icon PDF 127 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

High-Stakes Testing in Primary Schools

 

Lewisham Council welcomes the commitment of the Labour Party, the Liberal

Democrats and the Green Party to abolish SATs and other high-stakes testing

in primary schools.

 

It notes that:

 

1)         Statutory testing in primary schools has increased since 2010 and is

increasing further:by 2020, children will be tested in Reception (the Baseline

Assessment), Year 1 (the Phonics Screening Check), Year 2 (SATs), Year 4

(the Multiplication Tables Check) and Year 6 (SATs).

 

2)         The pressures of statutory assessment contribute to the crisis of

teacher morale, workload, recruitment and retention.

 

3)         Tests are focussed on the requirements of school accountability rather

than on support for children’s learning.

 

4)         The pressures of testing in primary schools have a detrimental effect

on children’s mental health.

 

5)         Educational research has demonstrated repeatedly that teaching to the

test narrows the curriculum and the educational experience of children,

focussing on labelling not learning.

 

6)         The National Education Union has agreed to carry out an indicative

ballot of its members to ask for their views about the campaign to abolish

high-stakes primary testing and whether they would be prepared to boycott

statutory high-stakes tests in primary schools.

 

This council believes that campaigning, by those who work in primary schools,

parents and academics, to end the current high-stakes system of primary

assessment should be welcomed, in particular the More Than A Score

campaign.

 

Lewisham Council resolves:

 

1)         To express its support for campaigns against the current system of

primary assessment, including those organised by teacher unions and More

Than A Score.

 

2)         To call a meeting of trade unions, parents and school governors to

discuss the council’s position on these matters and to coordinate a response.

 

3)         To lobby the Secretary of State for Education to listen to the growing

number of voices who are calling for the abolition of high-stakes testing in

primary schools.

 

4)         While the legal obligation to run SATs continues, to offer support to

schools which seek to manage their approach to assessment in ways which

put children first, and support a rich, broad and creative curriculum (as in the

More Than a Score pledge).

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Luke Sorba and formally seconded

by Councillor Coral Howard. The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

High-Stakes Testing in Primary Schools

 

Lewisham Council welcomes the commitment of the Labour Party, the Liberal

Democrats and the Green Party to abolish SATs and other high-stakes testing

in primary schools.

 

It notes that:

 

1)         Statutory testing in primary schools has increased since 2010 and is

increasing further:by 2020, children will be tested in Reception (the Baseline

Assessment), Year 1 (the Phonics Screening Check), Year 2 (SATs), Year 4

(the Multiplication Tables Check) and Year 6 (SATs).

 

2)         The pressures of statutory assessment contribute to the crisis of

teacher morale, workload, recruitment and retention.

 

3)         Tests are focussed on the requirements of school accountability rather

than on support for children’s learning.

 

4)         The pressures of testing in primary schools have a detrimental effect

on children’s mental health.

 

5)         Educational research has demonstrated repeatedly that teaching to the

test narrows the curriculum and the educational experience of children,

focussing on labelling not learning.

 

6)         The National Education Union has agreed to carry out an indicative

ballot of its members to ask for their views about the campaign to abolish

high-stakes primary testing and whether they would be prepared to boycott

statutory high-stakes tests in primary schools.

 

This council believes that campaigning, by those who work in primary schools,

parents and academics, to end the current high-stakes system of primary

assessment should be welcomed, in particular the More Than A Score

campaign.

 

Lewisham Council resolves:

 

1)         To express its support for campaigns against the current system of

primary assessment, including those organised by teacher unions and More

Than A Score.

 

2)         To call a meeting of trade unions, parents and school governors to

discuss the council’s position on these matters and to coordinate a response.

 

3)         To lobby the Secretary of State for Education to listen to the growing

number of voices who are calling for the abolition of high-stakes testing in

primary schools.

 

4)         While the legal obligation to run SATs continues, to offer support to

schools which seek to manage their approach to assessment in ways which

put children first, and support a rich, broad and creative curriculum (as in the

More Than a Score pledge).

18.

Motion 5 Councillor Penfold Councillor Gallagher pdf icon PDF 127 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Lift the Ban

 

Lewisham Council notes that:

 

(i) in London, there are at least 5,152  people seeking asylum in receipt of

subsistence payments (Section 95 support);

 

(ii) since 2002, people seeking asylum have only been able to apply for the

right to work after they have been waiting for a decision on their asylum claim

for over a year, and only if they can be employed into one of the narrow,

highly-skilled professions included on the Government’s Shortage Occupation

List;

 

(iii) people seeking asylum are left to live on £5.39 per day, struggling to

support themselves and their families, and left vulnerable to destitution,

isolation, and exploitation;

 

(iv) the potential foregone economic gain for the UK economy of allowing

people to work is estimated to be £42.4million via increased taxable income

and reduced payments of accommodation/subsistence support;

 

(v) 71% of people polled agreed with the statement: “when people come to

the UK seeking asylum it is important they integrate, learn English and get to

know people. It would help integration if asylum-seekers were allowed to work

if their claim takes more than six months to process”;

 

Lewisham Council believes that:

 

(i) people seeking asylum want to be able to work so that they can use their

skills and make the most of their potential, integrate into their communities,

and provide for themselves and their families;

 

(ii) restrictions on right to work can lead to extremely poor mental health

outcomes, and a waste of potentially invaluable talents and skills both for the

economy of Lewisham and the UK;

 

(iii) allowing people seeking asylum the right to work would therefore lead to

positive outcomes for those seeking asylum in Lewisham and for the local and

national economy;

 

Lewisham Council resolves to:

 

(i) join the Lift the Ban Coalition, which is campaigning to restore the right to

work for everyone waiting for more than 6 months for a decision on their

asylum claim.

 

(ii) Call on the UK Government to give people seeking asylum the right to

work unconstrained by the shortage occupation list after they have waited six

months for a decision on their initial asylum claim or further submission.

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Stephen Penfold and formally seconded

by Councillor Aisling Gallagher. The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Lift the Ban

 

Lewisham Council notes that:

 

(i) in London, there are at least 5,152  people seeking asylum in receipt of

subsistence payments (Section 95 support);

 

(ii) since 2002, people seeking asylum have only been able to apply for the

right to work after they have been waiting for a decision on their asylum claim

for over a year, and only if they can be employed into one of the narrow,

highly-skilled professions included on the Government’s Shortage Occupation

List;

 

(iii) people seeking asylum are left to live on £5.39 per day, struggling to

support themselves and their families, and left vulnerable to destitution,

isolation, and exploitation;

 

(iv) the potential foregone economic gain for the UK economy of allowing

people to work is estimated to be £42.4million via increased taxable income

and reduced payments of accommodation/subsistence support;

 

(v) 71% of people polled agreed with the statement: “when people come to

the UK seeking asylum it is important they integrate, learn English and get to

know people. It would help integration if asylum-seekers were allowed to work

if their claim takes more than six months to process”;

 

Lewisham Council believes that:

 

(i) people seeking asylum want to be able to work so that they can use their

skills and make the most of their potential, integrate into their communities,

and provide for themselves and their families;

 

(ii) restrictions on right to work can lead to extremely poor mental health

outcomes, and a waste of potentially invaluable talents and skills both for the

economy of Lewisham and the UK;

 

(iii) allowing people seeking asylum the right to work would therefore lead to

positive outcomes for those seeking asylum in Lewisham and for the local and

national economy;

 

Lewisham Council resolves to:

 

(i) join the Lift the Ban Coalition, which is campaigning to restore the right to

work for everyone waiting for more than 6 months for a decision on their

asylum claim.

 

(ii) Call on the UK Government to give people seeking asylum the right to

work unconstrained by the shortage occupation list after they have waited six

months for a decision on their initial asylum claim or further submission.

19.

Motion 6 Councillor Gallagher Councillor Walsh pdf icon PDF 143 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Standing with the Trans Community


This council notes

  • Trans people face significant disadvantage in society - one in four trans

people report being discriminated against in work, over a third avoid

expressing their gender through physical appearance in fear of being

assaulted or harassed, and almost 50% of trans people have

attempted suicide at some point in their lives (see

https://www.stonewall.org.uk/sites/default/files/trans_stats.pdf)

  • The UK government announced a review of the complex and

bureaucratic process within the Gender Recognition Act in 2017,

            including consulting on the principle of self-definition for gender

  • The Republic of Ireland adopted legal self-definition for trans people in

2015 without any reported negative impact

 

This council believes

  • Trans men are men, trans women are women, non-binary genders are

valid

  • There exists a movement who seek to drive trans women out of party

politics and out of public life under the guise of ‘legitimate concerns’

about how self-identification could impact women-only spaces

  • Trans people deserve respect and autonomy
  • Transphobia has a hugely detrimental impact on the mental health and

well-being of trans individuals

  • The moral panic around trans people accessing spaces is reminiscent

of the moral panic of 1980s, where gay, lesbian and bisexual people

were targeted and harassed and Section 28 was adopted (see

https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2018/04/26/british-newspapers-anti-transgender-moral-panic/)

  • Many tabloid stories used to justify the panic have since been proven

to be false and misleading (see https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2019/02/11/newspaper-retracts-claim-ian-huntley-transgender/)

  • That it is our duty as community leaders who seek to create an open

Lewisham to speak out against transphobia and make clear it will not

be tolerated under the guise of ‘legitimate concerns’ over someone’s

basic humanity

 

This council resolves

  • To urge the mayor and cabinet, as political leaders of this council, to

step up and be visible in challenging transphobia in our community

  • To support the principle of legal gender self-definition for trans people

living in the UK

 

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Aisling Gallagher and formally seconded

by Councillor James Walsh.The motion was then put to the vote and declared

to be overwhelmingly carried with two abstentions.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Standing with the Trans Community


This council notes

  • Trans people face significant disadvantage in society - one in four trans

people report being discriminated against in work, over a third avoid

expressing their gender through physical appearance in fear of being

assaulted or harassed, and almost 50% of trans people have

attempted suicide at some point in their lives (see

https://www.stonewall.org.uk/sites/default/files/trans_stats.pdf)

  • The UK government announced a review of the complex and

bureaucratic process within the Gender Recognition Act in 2017,

            including consulting on the principle of self-definition for gender

  • The Republic of Ireland adopted legal self-definition for trans people in

2015 without any reported negative impact

 

This council believes

  • Trans men are men, trans women are women, non-binary genders are

valid

  • There exists a movement who seek to drive trans women out of party

politics and out of public life under the guise of ‘legitimate concerns’

about how self-identification could impact women-only spaces

  • Trans people deserve respect and autonomy
  • Transphobia has a hugely detrimental impact on the mental health and

well-being of trans individuals

  • The moral panic around trans people accessing spaces is reminiscent

of the moral panic of 1980s, where gay, lesbian and bisexual people

were targeted and harassed and Section 28 was adopted (see

https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2018/04/26/british-newspapers-anti-transgender-moral-panic/)

  • Many tabloid stories used to justify the panic have since been proven

to be false and misleading (see https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2019/02/11/newspaper-retracts-claim-ian-huntley-transgender/)

  • That it is our duty as community leaders who seek to create an open

Lewisham to speak out against transphobia and make clear it will not

be tolerated under the guise of ‘legitimate concerns’ over someone’s

basic humanity

 

This council resolves

  • To urge the mayor and cabinet, as political leaders of this council, to

step up and be visible in challenging transphobia in our community

  • To support the principle of legal gender self-definition for trans people

living in the UK

 

20.

Motion 7 Councillor Slater Councillor Campbell pdf icon PDF 27 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Keep it Local

 

Lewisham Council is proud of the work we do to support the thriving

community sector, where we were the first London borough to agree a

compact with our voluntary and community sector back in 2001. The council is

working to unlock the potential in our borough, building strong local

partnerships, sharing power and maximising local strengths in community

organisations in Lewisham, who provide key services and support to our

residents. As stated in our corporate plan 2018-2022, we know that it is only

through strong and effective partnership working that we deliver better

outcomes for our citizens.

 

This Council will

Join the Keep it Local network and capacity build our local community sector

to support the following:

1.    Think about the whole system, not individual service silos.  

2.    Co-design services with our communities at both a borough and

ward level.  

3.    Focus on early intervention now to save costs tomorrow.  

4.    Commit to our community and proactively support local

organisations.  

5.    Believe in bringing services in-house, but where appropriate

thinking local

6.    Convene a discussion with the local community and local trade

unions to co-design what it means to Keep it Local in the Lewisham

setting.

7.    Continue to work with Locality and peer councils in the Keep it

Local Network to assess and improve our current practice.  

 

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor Jonathan Slater and formally seconded

by Councillor Julier Campbell. The motion was then put to the vote and

declared to be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Keep it Local

 

Lewisham Council is proud of the work we do to support the thriving

community sector, where we were the first London borough to agree a

compact with our voluntary and community sector back in 2001. The council is

working to unlock the potential in our borough, building strong local

partnerships, sharing power and maximising local strengths in community

organisations in Lewisham, who provide key services and support to our

residents. As stated in our corporate plan 2018-2022, we know that it is only

through strong and effective partnership working that we deliver better

outcomes for our citizens.

 

This Council will

Join the Keep it Local network and capacity build our local community sector

to support the following:

1.    Think about the whole system, not individual service silos.  

2.    Co-design services with our communities at both a borough and

ward level.  

3.    Focus on early intervention now to save costs tomorrow.  

4.    Commit to our community and proactively support local

organisations.  

5.    Believe in bringing services in-house, but where appropriate

thinking local

6.    Convene a discussion with the local community and local trade

unions to co-design what it means to Keep it Local in the Lewisham

setting.

7.    Continue to work with Locality and peer councils in the Keep it

Local Network to assess and improve our current practice.  

 

21.

Motion 8 Councillor Muldoon Councillor Maslin pdf icon PDF 123 KB

Decision:

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Hedgehogs

 

Lewisham Council cherishes hedgehogs as a valuable part of native British

wildlife and their contribution in controlling populations of slugs and snails in

gardens;

 

Lewisham Council welcomes their designation as a protected species; is very

concerned at the findings of the 2018 report, entitled The State of British

Hedgehogs, that hedgehog numbers have fallen by 30 per cent in urban

areas and by at least 50 per cent in rural areas since 2000;

 

Lewisham Council further welcomes the work of the British Hedgehog

Preservation Society to raise awareness and support for hedgehogs;

 

Lewisham Council calls on Her Majesty’s Government to withdraw the licence

for A24 rat traps that are designed to kill hedgehogs in New Zealand and are

being sold unaltered in the UK where it is illegal to kill hedgehogs in such

traps but the correct usage is impossible to monitor.

 

Lewisham Council resolves to ask Trading Standards to use any powers

available to them to prevent such traps being sold in Lewisham

Minutes:

The motion was moved by Councillor John Muldoon and formally seconded

by Councillor Paul Maslin.The motion was then put to the vote and declared to

be unanimously carried.

 

RESOLVED that the following motion be agreed:

 

Hedgehogs

 

Lewisham Council cherishes hedgehogs as a valuable part of native British

wildlife and their contribution in controlling populations of slugs and snails in

gardens;

 

Lewisham Council welcomes their designation as a protected species; is very

concerned at the findings of the 2018 report, entitled The State of British

Hedgehogs, that hedgehog numbers have fallen by 30 per cent in urban

areas and by at least 50 per cent in rural areas since 2000;

 

Lewisham Council further welcomes the work of the British Hedgehog

Preservation Society to raise awareness and support for hedgehogs;

 

Lewisham Council calls on Her Majesty’s Government to withdraw the licence

for A24 rat traps that are designed to kill hedgehogs in New Zealand and are

being sold unaltered in the UK where it is illegal to kill hedgehogs in such

traps but the correct usage is impossible to monitor.

 

Lewisham Council resolves to ask Trading Standards to use any powers

available to them to prevent such traps being sold in Lewisham.

 

The meeting closed at 9.42pm